SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis – plumitapacifica.com

20 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of posts on my blog to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a Guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers:

Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

And just in case you’re interested… here’s the table of contents:

Introduction and Preliminary Comments – 3, My First Trip -15, Lost in Guanacaste – Playa Coyote – 20, Trust with a Child – 26, Lost in Panama – 29, Attorneys – 35, My Contractor – 38, My Security Guard – 61, My Toldo – 67, Getting a Land Line Phone and Internet – 76, A Cellular Phone – 115, A Country Doctor – 124, A Lesson Well Learned – 130, A Little Green Frog – 138, A Little Brown Frog and a Bat – 146, A “Murphy’s Law” Day – 153, Driving in the Rainy Season – 161, Drunk Drivers – 174, Fiesta del Toros – 185, Getting a Drivers License – 195, INS and a Minor Accident – 203, Lifeguards – 224, Passing through Customs – 232, Rules of the Road for Tico Driving – 236, San Jose – 241, Shopping and Making Tamales – 250, Taking the Bus – 272, Turtles in My Front Yard – 281, Untitled – 287, When it Rains it Pours (sometimes) – 294, She Found My Lot – 307, My First Traffic Ticket – 312, Ticket # 2 – 316, My Radar Detector – 318, Ticket # 3 (after a slow speed chase) – 324, A Christmas Parade – 338, Sex (the truth about ticos) – 343, Photo Album – 347, Appendix – 374

chapter 9 continued

I’ve already discovered that I can’t be found that way when strictly by accident during my December visit I just happened to be at bar… when a frustrated guy that was trying to find me came in and asked if anyone knew where Gary Davis lived.   I’m a bit hard to find because if you go down the road 500 meters north of bar… you can’t see my house looking down my road towards the beach through the dense jungle.  

Anyway, back to ICE, finally they’re ready to go to my place.   They follow me.   We get there.   They get out of their truck and say “we can’t install your line”.   Now wait a minute, I’ve got a power pole at my driveway (that I had to pay for because that’s they way it works here), and another one at the main road about 200 meters away and the power line strung between them is at least 20 feet off the ground.   But no, the reason they can’t install my phone line is because they need another pole half way in between because their line (they say) will sag down low enough that someone could vandalize it.  So where do I get a pole and who pays for it and who installs it.   Guess what… me.   And they have no idea where I get one.   But I should call, and they write a name and number on a piece of paper, this guy who will come out to survey the situation and advise me.   It’s almost dark by now so I know there’s no sense calling now because these kinds of workers start early and usually knock off around 4pm.  

The next day I call.   The guy says to call back next Tuesday morning.  I call.   He says he’ll be out next week.  This is not the guy I mentioned earlier that by luck I happened to be at bar…  But coincidentally when he showed up and I was again at bar…

(Which is really just a fun and funky old beach bar) but this story makes it sound like I drink a lot.  Actually I hardly drink at all.  A glass of wine with dinner is about it.  But everything was new to me and I wasn’t really settled in to my house so bar Junquillal was a good place to meet some of my neighbors, especially at sunset when people gathered there to enjoy the sunset, look to see if there might be a “green flash”, which I have now seen many times, and get their evening started.  Shortly after sunset is when I usually left because some of my neighbors and tourists got more than just “started”.  Anyway, he follows me to my place, looks at the situation and says “you need another pole” (he needs a security guard at this point).  

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis – plumitapacifica.com

19 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of posts on my blog to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a Guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers:

Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

And just in case you’re interested… here’s the table of contents:

Introduction and Preliminary Comments – 3, My First Trip -15, Lost in Guanacaste – Playa Coyote – 20, Trust with a Child – 26, Lost in Panama – 29, Attorneys – 35, My Contractor – 38, My Security Guard – 61, My Toldo – 67, Getting a Land Line Phone and Internet – 76, A Cellular Phone – 115, A Country Doctor – 124, A Lesson Well Learned – 130, A Little Green Frog – 138, A Little Brown Frog and a Bat – 146, A “Murphy’s Law” Day – 153, Driving in the Rainy Season – 161, Drunk Drivers – 174, Fiesta del Toros – 185, Getting a Drivers License – 195, INS and a Minor Accident – 203, Lifeguards – 224, Passing through Customs – 232, Rules of the Road for Tico Driving – 236, San Jose – 241, Shopping and Making Tamales – 250, Taking the Bus – 272, Turtles in My Front Yard – 281, Untitled – 287, When it Rains it Pours (sometimes) – 294, She Found My Lot – 307, My First Traffic Ticket – 312, Ticket # 2 – 316, My Radar Detector – 318, Ticket # 3 (after a slow speed chase) – 324, A Christmas Parade – 338, Sex (the truth about ticos) – 343, Photo Album – 347, Appendix – 374

chapter 9 continued

By this time though there was only one person waiting so the guy motioned for me to come right over. Whew.   He takes my receipt, stamps it, pulls out an 8-1/2×11 sheet with BIG numbers on it, tells me I have to post it (I never did figure out where, but my construction workers put it in a couple different places, not that it matters as you will soon see), and says they’ll be there within two weeks to install my line.   It’s mid December and my house isn’t quite ready for me to camp out in it yet but my contractor assures me it will be in January.   I go back to Ca. to be with family and friends for the holidays.   I’ll return in January.

Two weeks go by.  Four weeks go by.   It’s mid January and my house is no where near “done” but at least there is a shower (cold water only), a bathroom sink and a toilet.   What else do I need?   I begin my new life in C.R. camping out in my house.   I’ll buy a BBQ later so I can at least cook something too.   But no phone, so I take the sixty minute drive back down the rough dirt road to the ICE office and ask “when”.   He says in the next two weeks (I guess that’s code for “god knows when”).  Three more weeks go by.   I pull out of my road one day onto the main road and just down the road I see the ICE truck stopped and a couple guys are working on something.   I stop and ask them if they’re coming to my place.   One of the guys thumbs through a stack of work orders and says “yes, give us 5 minutes”.   I don’t leave.   No way am I going to leave and hope they find me because this is when I learn they don’t have the map and 500 meters north of bar…

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis – plumitapacifica.com

18 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of posts on my blog to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a Guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers:

Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

And just in case you’re interested… here’s the table of contents:

Introduction and Preliminary Comments – 3, My First Trip -15, Lost in Guanacaste – Playa Coyote – 20, Trust with a Child – 26, Lost in Panama – 29, Attorneys – 35, My Contractor – 38, My Security Guard – 61, My Toldo – 67, Getting a Land Line Phone and Internet – 76, A Cellular Phone – 115, A Country Doctor – 124, A Lesson Well Learned – 130, A Little Green Frog – 138, A Little Brown Frog and a Bat – 146, A “Murphy’s Law” Day – 153, Driving in the Rainy Season – 161, Drunk Drivers – 174, Fiesta del Toros – 185, Getting a Drivers License – 195, INS and a Minor Accident – 203, Lifeguards – 224, Passing through Customs – 232, Rules of the Road for Tico Driving – 236, San Jose – 241, Shopping and Making Tamales – 250, Taking the Bus – 272, Turtles in My Front Yard – 281, Untitled – 287, When it Rains it Pours (sometimes) – 294, She Found My Lot – 307, My First Traffic Ticket – 312, Ticket # 2 – 316, My Radar Detector – 318, Ticket # 3 (after a slow speed chase) – 324, A Christmas Parade – 338, Sex (the truth about ticos) – 343, Photo Album – 347, Appendix – 374

chapter 9 continued

So this guy examines my papers and finally says “OK, you can pay”.  By the way, I must admit I was impressed with the fact that even though there are no address’s in C.R., he pulls out this map showing in good detail all the roads and the beach in the area where I live, and pinpoints my location.    My “official” address is 500 meters north of bar Playa Junquillal but now it is also 200 meters west of the main road.  It has, since I began recording this experience, been changed to “200 meters west of hotel Castillo Divertido” (translation: Fun Castle) which is not quite as accurate but seems to work better.   But now we have an actual point on the map where the lines intersect.   However, they don’t give the map to their installers so they can find you (more on that later).

OK, so now I can pay.  I pull out my money and he say’s “no, you have to pay at… and describes the location.   No address’s, remember?  But with my weak Spanish all I get is he keeps saying the word rojo (red) as I request that he repeat himself slowly several times.   Finally, I’m too embarrassed to make him repeat himself again, so I pretend like I get it and leave.   Now, he was indicating that whatever it was that is red isn’t very far away so I figure if I just go out and look I’ll see something red and go there and pay.   I look up and down the street and the only thing red I see is a store in the next block that has a red awning but it’s a shoe store.   I wander around for awhile and finally give in to the fact that whatever it is that is red I just don’t see.   So I go back to the office and the security guard (I’m beginning to understand, at this point, why they need one) takes pity on me and walks me outside to point at the two little steps across the street that are painted red.   I swear, these two little steps are only about two feet wide.

And they lead to a tiny little window on the other side of which is a bored looking person just waiting to take your money.   I pay thinking I’m done.

Nope, the bored person tells me I have to take the receipt back to the ICE office to complete the transaction.   Oh my god, another wait in line (for sure they need a security guard).

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis – plumitapacifica.com

16 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of posts on my blog to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a Guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers:

Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

And just in case you’re interested… here’s the table of contents:

Introduction and Preliminary Comments – 3, My First Trip -15, Lost in Guanacaste – Playa Coyote – 20, Trust with a Child – 26, Lost in Panama – 29, Attorneys – 35, My Contractor – 38, My Security Guard – 61, My Toldo – 67, Getting a Land Line Phone and Internet – 76, A Cellular Phone – 115, A Country Doctor – 124, A Lesson Well Learned – 130, A Little Green Frog – 138, A Little Brown Frog and a Bat – 146, A “Murphy’s Law” Day – 153, Driving in the Rainy Season – 161, Drunk Drivers – 174, Fiesta del Toros – 185, Getting a Drivers License – 195, INS and a Minor Accident – 203, Lifeguards – 224, Passing through Customs – 232, Rules of the Road for Tico Driving – 236, San Jose – 241, Shopping and Making Tamales – 250, Taking the Bus – 272, Turtles in My Front Yard – 281, Untitled – 287, When it Rains it Pours (sometimes) – 294, She Found My Lot – 307, My First Traffic Ticket – 312, Ticket # 2 – 316, My Radar Detector – 318, Ticket # 3 (after a slow speed chase) – 324, A Christmas Parade – 338, Sex (the truth about ticos) – 343, Photo Album – 347, Appendix – 374

chapter 9

GETTING A LAND LINE PHONE and INTERNET

In the states it’s relatively easy.  You call the phone company, give them your address etc., a few days later you plug in your phone and talk.  And we get impatient because it took “a few days”.  Keep in mind that this episode began mid December 2006.

Try this.  You don’t call the phone company because they only have one [1] (it’s called ICE, I haven’t figured out yet what those letters stand for) and it’s a government controlled monopoly with a strong union and filled with exactly the kind of government workers we make jokes about and shake our heads at in the states.   No, you go to the ICE (pronounced ee-say) office (if you can find it), take your documentation (corporate papers and some utility bill in the corporate name and passport.   Don’t ask me what you do if you’re not a corporation, pray maybe).   You take a number when you enter, sit there for an hour or so (I took a nap the first time sitting in my chair), then when your number is called you hope you have everything you need with you.  You’d think you were applying for entry into another country.   I mean, what’s so dangerous about letting someone have a phone?   But they have a well armed, very bored looking, security guard standing there.   I think I know now why they have a security guard.  Read on. 

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis – plumitapacifica.com

15 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of posts on my blog to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a Guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers:

Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

And just in case you’re interested… here’s the table of contents:

Introduction and Preliminary Comments – 3, My First Trip -15, Lost in Guanacaste – Playa Coyote – 20, Trust with a Child – 26, Lost in Panama – 29, Attorneys – 35, My Contractor – 38, My Security Guard – 61, My Toldo – 67, Getting a Land Line Phone and Internet – 76, A Cellular Phone – 115, A Country Doctor – 124, A Lesson Well Learned – 130, A Little Green Frog – 138, A Little Brown Frog and a Bat – 146, A “Murphy’s Law” Day – 153, Driving in the Rainy Season – 161, Drunk Drivers – 174, Fiesta del Toros – 185, Getting a Drivers License – 195, INS and a Minor Accident – 203, Lifeguards – 224, Passing through Customs – 232, Rules of the Road for Tico Driving – 236, San Jose – 241, Shopping and Making Tamales – 250, Taking the Bus – 272, Turtles in My Front Yard – 281, Untitled – 287, When it Rains it Pours (sometimes) – 294, She Found My Lot – 307, My First Traffic Ticket – 312, Ticket # 2 – 316, My Radar Detector – 318, Ticket # 3 (after a slow speed chase) – 324, A Christmas Parade – 338, Sex (the truth about ticos) – 343, Photo Album – 347, Appendix – 374

chapter 8 continued

Anyway, back to the lady in the rose colored house.  She says yes!  Go across this tiny little bridge and it’s the second house and her name is Benigna.  Benignas house is green but it has a rose colored stripe around the bottom (the guy was close).  So I got my toldo made by Benigna.  Do you know… the total cost of material and labor was only about $25!  She charged me $8 labor.  I gave her $10.  The thing is 10’x10’x8′ high.  I’ve won the guerra de los zancudos as far as my sleeping area is concerned and had a great time doing it.

Within a few weeks I began to realize that I also needed to win the war in the rest of my house.  I read an article in National Geographic magazine that stated two interesting facts.

  1. Mosquitoes are attracted to your perspiration.  I’m in trouble.  I haven’t acclimated to the climate in paradise yet where every day the temperature ranges 80% – 85% and humidity ranges 50% – 80% depending on which season it is (dry or rainy).  And I perspire profusely without even moving.  Add a little movement and I drip like a faucet.
  2. It’s only the female that goes after your blood.  They need it for the health of their eggs.  And it seems there are a lot of females here.  Hmmmm… (kind of reminds me of the human kind in ticalandia.)

So it was back to Veintisiete and Benigna for curtains around my decks.  I have all my windows screened.  I have all the spaces above and around the open areas of my decks screened.  I purchased more mosquito net type fabric and had Benny (as she calls herself) make curtains that I can close after dusk, which is when the little bi….s come out. They’re actually quite nice because they’re very shear so I can see through them in the day time.  No spoiling my views.  They also provide a bit of privacy when closed because it’s like the effect glass has.  If its darker on the inside than it is on the outside you can’t see in.  And they help cut the amount of rain that hits the decks as well.

Then, because I’ve had so much Alaska experience having been raised there, where the mosquito is considered the state bird, I purchased the type of machine they use.  This is a machine that attracts then captures mosquitoes.

And to top it all off I installed a bat house high up on the south wall of my house.  I understand those little critters feast on mosquitoes.  Unfortunately, it got inhabited first by mud wasps so I don’t see too many bats around at night.

But, I have won the war.  It took me eight or ten months to get to this point but now I can set out on my deck at night, with the curtains open even, and not be attacked.

And here is a very interesting side note.  I subscribe to National Geographic magazine.  They recently had a brief article on how to rid your place of mosquitoes.  Pour your old coffee grounds in the places where they breed.  The coffee grounds prevent the eggs from developing.  I’ve been giving Mario my delicious Costa Rican coffee grounds after I have enjoyed the coffee and he puts them where they need to be and I now have very few mosquitoes!

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis – plumitapacifica.com

14 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of posts on my blog to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a Guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers:

Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

And just in case you’re interested… here’s the table of contents:

Introduction and Preliminary Comments – 3, My First Trip -15, Lost in Guanacaste – Playa Coyote – 20, Trust with a Child – 26, Lost in Panama – 29, Attorneys – 35, My Contractor – 38, My Security Guard – 61, My Toldo – 67, Getting a Land Line Phone and Internet – 76, A Cellular Phone – 115, A Country Doctor – 124, A Lesson Well Learned – 130, A Little Green Frog – 138, A Little Brown Frog and a Bat – 146, A “Murphy’s Law” Day – 153, Driving in the Rainy Season – 161, Drunk Drivers – 174, Fiesta del Toros – 185, Getting a Drivers License – 195, INS and a Minor Accident – 203, Lifeguards – 224, Passing through Customs – 232, Rules of the Road for Tico Driving – 236, San Jose – 241, Shopping and Making Tamales – 250, Taking the Bus – 272, Turtles in My Front Yard – 281, Untitled – 287, When it Rains it Pours (sometimes) – 294, She Found My Lot – 307, My First Traffic Ticket – 312, Ticket # 2 – 316, My Radar Detector – 318, Ticket # 3 (after a slow speed chase) – 324, A Christmas Parade – 338, Sex (the truth about ticos) – 343, Photo Album – 347, Appendix – 374

chapter 8 continued

Ok, no problem, it’s just another adventure.  I pay for the fabric and I’m off to find the wizard.  I get to a group of buildings in what I think must be the pueblo and there’s a couple guys working on a chain link fence that goes around some official looking building so I stop the car, get out with my fabric and ask if they know a lady around there that sows things.  They look at me like “how the hell would we know”.  Turns out they don’t live there.  They’re just there to fix the fence.  But just then along comes a guy riding a bicycle.  They point and say “ask him.”  So I stop the guy, ask the same question, he says he has no idea but I should go a little farther and directs me around a couple more rights and lefts.  I take the rights and lefts and soon I see a house with three toothless old men setting on the front porch.  Once again I stop, get out with my fabric, walk right up to them, they look at me like “oh my god… what’s this gringo want… should we get our machete’s” but I quickly put them at ease and ask my question.  They have no idea but once again here comes a guy on a bicycle and they point and…  So I stop the guy on the bike, ask my question, he says “maybe”.  Fantastic!  I’m getting close.   He says he thinks the lady might live in the rose colored house a little further on.  I come to a rose colored house.  I knock on the door. 

This lady comes to the door, opens it far enough to peek at me and she has the same look on her face the old guys did.  I guess they don’t see too many gringos in Veintisiete because there’s really no reason for a tourist to go there.  It’s just this tiny little place with a few houses, a school and a special technical college of some kind.  I’ve since taken the bus from P. Junquillal to Santa Cruz and it goes into Veintisiete on the way.

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis – plumitapacifica.com

13 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of posts on my blog to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a Guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers:

Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

And just in case you’re interested… here’s the table of contents:

Introduction and Preliminary Comments – 3, My First Trip -15, Lost in Guanacaste – Playa Coyote – 20, Trust with a Child – 26, Lost in Panama – 29, Attorneys – 35, My Contractor – 38, My Security Guard – 61, My Toldo – 67, Getting a Land Line Phone and Internet – 76, A Cellular Phone – 115, A Country Doctor – 124, A Lesson Well Learned – 130, A Little Green Frog – 138, A Little Brown Frog and a Bat – 146, A “Murphy’s Law” Day – 153, Driving in the Rainy Season – 161, Drunk Drivers – 174, Fiesta del Toros – 185, Getting a Drivers License – 195, INS and a Minor Accident – 203, Lifeguards – 224, Passing through Customs – 232, Rules of the Road for Tico Driving – 236, San Jose – 241, Shopping and Making Tamales – 250, Taking the Bus – 272, Turtles in My Front Yard – 281, Untitled – 287, When it Rains it Pours (sometimes) – 294, She Found My Lot – 307, My First Traffic Ticket – 312, Ticket # 2 – 316, My Radar Detector – 318, Ticket # 3 (after a slow speed chase) – 324, A Christmas Parade – 338, Sex (the truth about ticos) – 343, Photo Album – 347, Appendix – 374

chapter 8 continued

Now I need to know if she knows someone who can make it.  This is where it gets interesting.  It’s one thing for me to understand a very clear and patient native Spanish speaker.  Try understanding Spanish with a Chinese accent.  But she says yes, she knows a lady who can make it.  I figure she’s going to give me directions to some house in town and she says “veintisiete” (27).  27?  What’s 27?  The lady is 27?  She lives 27 blocks away?  No, she says, veintisiete, veintisiete, with her Spangnese.  I say to myself “don’t show frustration, that won’t help, remain calm, keep your attitude positive, etc.”  And we proceed to go round and round around the word veintisiete.  Finally, she says “pequena puente” (little bridge).  We go round and round around pequena puente for awhile when all of a sudden it hits me!  There’s a little bridge about 17 km from town, right where the pavement ends and the dirt road starts, that I go across each time I go to town.  I ask her if that’s the bridge she’s talking about.  Yes!!  Then she says veintisiete is 1 or 2 km past the bridge.  I get excited because I think I’m getting close to discovering something. 

It turns out that just after you cross the bridge onto the dirt there is an intersection where I have to turn left and then within a quarter mile another intersection where I have to turn right to get to Playa Junquillal.  At that intersection there is a road sign with arrows pointing various directions and the names of towns printed by the arrows and at the top of the sign I’ve always wondered why they would put a date with an arrow pointing straight ahead.  The date is 27 de abril (27 of April).  Good grief, there’s a town named 27 of April!!  I get it!  It’s only 1 km from the sign.  That’s where I need to go next!  Fantastic… what’s her name and where does she live?  My little old Chinese lady has no idea.  She just knows there’s a lady in 27 of April who sows things. 

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