Archive | February, 2013

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise

28 Feb

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 16 continued

I walked up to where the collapsed bridge was and there stood 2 bored looking cops so I asked how I might get to P. Junquillal.   Easy, go back to the intersection, hang a left, follow the signs… piece of cake.  Until the pavement ran out.  Now, coincidentally, where the pavement ended and the dirt began was the section of the road that I thought was being prepared to be paved.  You see, rumor had it that both the road to Tamarindo and Junquillal from Santa Cruz would be paved with the one to Junquillal starting late October.  It’s October 20 now so you can understand my anxious anticipation, especially if you’ve read some of my other journal entries that describe the terrible condition of the dirt road.  The Tamarindo segment, I thought, had been started in August.  From Santa Cruz the first seventeen kilometers was paved years ago.  It’s already starting to fall apart (who knows when it will be re-paved or repaired).   At the end of the pavement the road forks.  Take the right fork to Tamarindo, the left to Junquillal.    I could swear I saw a grader at the beginning of the Tamarindo segment in August and near the fork there is an area that has been cleared that now has a huge pile of gravel and huge trucks parked or moving in and out of the area.  It was very encouraging to see all that.  It looked as if maybe it wasn’t just a rumor.  Therefore I was looking forward to driving on graded dirt when I came to the Tamarindo end of that stretch.  No such luck; it was every bit as bad as the Junquillal segment.  Don’t ask me where all that gravel and those trucks are going.

 

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SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise

27 Feb

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 16 continued

But…

The main (only) highway between Liberia, where the airport I need is located, and Santa Cruz, the nearest town with shopping opportunities and internet café I use, is not the Pan American highway.  But it is paved and will support speeds up to 60 mph (infrequently).  It is the only direct route to the airport and I encounter it at Santa Cruz.

Santa Cruz is approximately forty five minutes from the airport and it’s where I turn off the highway to make the dreaded trip down the rough, pothole ridden, average speed 10 mph dirt road to P. Junquillal.

I had left the airport more tired than usual because on this trip I had to go through Atlanta.   I had arrived at a town called Belen and saw that there were concrete pylons with steel posts sticking out of them to about four feet into the air just past a major intersection.  The pylons were in a straight row covering my side of the highway only.  There was no signage of any kind accompanying the pylons so I went around them wondering why they were there.  About a half kilometer later I came upon some cars, busses and trucks parked in a fashion that made further progress difficult at best.   I came to a stop to survey the situation and realized that up in the distance about 200 feet there was a large earth moving machine in the road.  Hmmmm… wonder what’s going on?  I sat there in my car for awhile until it became clear that there was no movement of traffic.  So I got out and walked up to where the construction was and much to my dismay saw that there was no longer a passable bridge across the stream that was now a raging torrent.  I should interject here that after having been up since early Friday morning and it is now 3pm on Saturday with not much sleep on the plane that left L.A. at 1am, had a two hour lay over in Atlanta and a total of eight hours flight time, I was a little tired and anxious to get home, get something to eat and go to bed.

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise

26 Feb

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 16

DRIVING – RAINY SEASON

Costa Rica presents an interesting paradox.  The hardest thing for a country to do is make peace with its neighbors, announce itself as a country which recognizes only peaceful intent and disband all military forces.   The easiest thing for a country to do is fix its roads.

Paradoxically, Costa Rica did the former after it won a war with a northern neighbor, suffered its own revolution and then immediately declared its peaceful intent and disbanded all military forces in 1949.  But the roads, well, they have not yet figured out how to solve that problem.

Drive more slowly here.  There are many unexpected circumstances that will occur.

If the drivers here could resolve the anger/frustration that builds with each teeth rattling pothole they fall into maybe they could see the comedy in the irony of the paradox.  I do but most people I talk to about it are just plain pissed.

During the dry season you only have to be careful.  There are the usual pitfalls such as potholes, no shoulders, people, cows, horses, pigs and other assorted critters in the road.  And then of course if you’re on the main highway, the one they call the Pan American highway, you need to be very careful especially in the mountains.  It’s so tempting to pass that black smoke belching truck that can’t go more than ten miles per hour that you’ve been following for miles because there are no turn-outs and the mountain road is very curvy.  At least the vistas are spectacular but watch it!  I’ve almost run off the road many times because I’m looking at the view and the road turns.  That’s another reason to take the bus.

However, during the rainy season there are more serious and treacherous conditions.  The potholes are bigger, deeper, way more frequent (as in linked) and can be disguised.  If a pothole is filled with water you really can’t tell how deep it is.  And there can be sections of the road that cave in leaving gaping holes that would be fatal if driven into. There is one such hole on the road to Santa Cruz.  Every time I go across what little road is left above the stream I can’t help but look down to see if there is a car down there.  It’s only about a twenty foot drop but it’s straight down.  One day I had picked up some ticos on my way and one of the women made some comment about how dangerous this gaping hole was if someone were to be going fast and not see it.  I pointed out that the gigantic potholes in the road on either side of the crevasse would probably prevent anyone from going fast enough to fall in.  Everyone laughed because it hit them that her thought was somewhat ludicrous.  So far so good.

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise

25 Feb

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 15 continued

Now just so you’ll know, I’ve gotten over nervously fidgeting when things are not going my way.  Remember the name I’ve come up with for this country?  “Costa Rica, the country where your plans don’t matter”, because no matter what you plan they will get changed.  So instead of being upset or fidgety I simply say to myself “hmmmm lets see how this plays out”.   And you know, it’s been wonderful learning this lesson because things always work out in some interesting fashion.

The bus arrived in San Jose at 7:15pm.  Wow, a whole fifteen minutes early.  But then there was the matter of taking a taxi to the hotel at which I had reservations.  Traffic in S.J. is abdominal at best but this night it was worse.  I discovered the reason why when I got to Gran Hotel Costa Rica.  The hotel shares a plaza with the national theatre, which is the opera house.  They are both beautiful old colonial structures having been built around the turn of the 20th century.  They are located on avenida segundo, which is downtown San Jose’s main street.  This is a four lane one way street that never has less than five lanes of traffic crowded onto it.  But on this night the cops have two of the lanes blocked off for parking for a couple blocks because the president of the county, Oscar Arias, is giving an address in the national theatre.  And wouldn’t you know, my hotel is right behind Gran Hotel Costa Rica.

I finally got to Al’s house at 8:30 and of course the first words out of my mouth, after the informal and warm greetings, were “did anyone give you money”.  No!  And furthermore, the second guy to show up was the guy working with the agent and not only had he decided not to buy the car, he had left with the keys!   So here it is Saturday night.  I had left the agents phone number in my Franklin planner in my hotel room because it was too late to call anyway.  No one works on Sunday.  Monday is a national holiday (Juan Santa Maria day, who was a national hero from the colonial era).

So Al and Maritza and I went to dinner, had great conversation, a couple bottles of wine and I was in bed by 1am.  I finally reached the agent Monday night who said the keys will be delivered to Al on Tuesday (does that sound like “the check is in the mail”?).  It is now 10:30 Tuesday night and no word from Al.

Hmmmm lets see how this plays out.

The keys showed up on Wednesday.

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise

23 Feb

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 15 continued

Well, at 8:30 I was ready to leave.  Then the phone rings.  It’s one of the potential buyers.  We have a lengthy conversation which involves answering his many questions.  He finally signs off with the indication that he will send a friend on Saturday, who lives in S.J., to look at the car and if it passes the friends inspection he will leave a deposit with Al.   The buyer also lived two hours away from S.J.  Then the phone rings again.  This time it’s the other potential buyer, whom I have never talked with because he was using an agent and all my conversations previously had been only with the agent, and I explain to him it may be too late.  Then the phone rings again and it’s the agent asking if I would give them the first right of refusal since they had been the first to contact me.   Of course I said no.   I said the first person to show up on Saturday that gives Al a deposit gets the car.  Coincidentally, I had the 2008 registration sticker for the car with me and had told the agent in an earlier conversation that I would contact them when I got in to San Jose so they could drive the car to their inspection facility.  That was part of the reason I was hoping to get to S.J. in the mid afternoon.

By now it’s 9:45.  So much for catching the 10am bus.  No problem, I’ll catch the 12:00 noon bus.   That puts me in S.J. around 5:30 and even though it’s a little late they may still be able to do the inspection.

Someone who has lived in Playa Junquillal for fifteen years told me a long time ago when I got my first flat tire that I’d have lots of those.   He was right.  In the fifteen months I’ve lived here I’ve had eight flats and two blow outs.   If you’ve ever driven Costa Rica roads you know why you get so many flats.

Yep, I go to my car, it has a flat.  In the short time I have lived here I have now changed more tires than in the sum total of the rest of my adult life.

So even though I’m pretty fast at it now, by the time I got it changed and to the repair shop it was 10:30.  Ok, I’m thinking that I’m cutting it pretty close because I still have to take my car to the secure (sort of) place I leave it in Santa Cruz and then get a cab to the bus depot.

So I decide to go get the ticket first then go park my car.   I made it to the bus terminal a couple minutes after 11.  There were 31 people in line for tickets to San Jose!  In all the times I’ve been to that terminal I’ve never had more than 6 or 8 people in front of me.  Well, it was 12:05 by the time I got up to the ticket window.   I bought a ticket for the 2pm bus and went and had lunch and a couple beers.

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise

22 Feb

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 15 continued

I was a little nervous because I learned a long time ago the importance of buying the ticket early (see Taking the bus).  So I just figured I’d get up early, go into Santa Cruz and hopefully get a ticket for the 10am bus which would put me in S.J. around 3:30 because I had agreed to get there early enough for one of the potential buyers to take the car to a mechanic for inspection.

I got up at 6am.  I was about ready to leave when Rafael, a day labor type person and artist whom I had been trying to connect with, showed up at 7am.  Rafael is a wonderful person and a really good artist.  I’ve hired him in the past to do various odd jobs and have several pieces of his art in my house.  He does really nice wood carvings on boards that originally were flat.  But a year or so ago he had a stroke which left him with a speech problem coupled with a lessoned ability to understand what you are trying to get him to understand.  Of course the poor guy has trouble getting work and he lives in Santa Cruz and he had driven his motorcycle to my house.  So I wasn’t about to send him away.  Hell, one time he was so broke that when he got to my house I gave him an advance on the work he was going to do so he could buy gas to get back home.  And also, I have learned that when a worker does show up you better take advantage of it because you never know when you’ll see them again.  In this country of mañana land relaxed attitudes the thought of keeping a schedule is a joke.

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise

21 Feb

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 15 continued

A note on buying/selling cars in C.R.  There is no “Craig’s List” and even though you can advertise in a paper it was interesting for me to discover that ticos want the car to be “like new”.  And you will need an attorney.

The good news is I have a friend, Al, who lives in S.J.  He was kind enough to offer to let me park the car at his house in a very secure part of his property.  Al doesn’t drive because his vision is restricted but he agreed to sit in the passenger seat whenever someone wanted to take it for a drive.  I gave him all the paperwork and the keys with the simple request that if someone wanted to buy it to take a deposit and tell them I would come to S.J. immediately to finish the transaction.  Buying a car in C.R. is not as simple as it is in Ca.  They don’t have a DMV and it requires an attorney to handle the transfer of title.

The months passed.  I kept lowering the price.  Finally it is priced well under the market to the extent that one person was skeptical because the price was so low.  Still no buyers.  Then, all of a sudden, I get two calls the same day from two very interested sounding people.  They both want to buy the car almost sight unseen.  So I agree to come to S.J.  to meet whoever.  That was on Friday.  I’ll come on Saturday.

Friday afternoon I go to Santa Cruz, where the bus terminal is, to buy the ticket.  The last bus leaves at 6pm.  I arrive at 6:15.  The window is closed.  “Murphy” has just entered the story.