Archive | August, 2013

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis plumitapacifica.com

29 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 4 continued

The next stupid thing I did was the next day.  I’m lost again in some little pueblo where I had wandered around looking for the beach but I see this lady walking down the road so I pull up and ask in my best (what a joke) Spanish where the main highway is.  She says please speak English. Turns out she’s a gringa married to a Panamanian lawyer and politician who lives part time in both countries. She tells me how to get to the main highway and I proceed to turn my car around.  Bang!  My back wheel falls into a concrete drainage ditch that had been concealed by weeds.  Fortunately she hadn’t gone very far so I got her attention.  Of course she’s fluent in Panamanian Spanish and there was like a ranch house nearby.  She goes up to the house and in a few minutes here comes six guy’s who simply pick my little American 2 door sedan up and set it back on the road. I try to pay them ($5).  They totally refuse.  I say it’s for cervesa.  They happily accept.

I’m off and on to the next adventure which occurs at the next hotel.  I happily discover that Panamanian cops, who set up speed traps the same way C.R. cops do, also accept your “payment” of the “ticket” on the spot.  Except with Panamanian Spanish it was harder to figure that out.  It was still early in the afternoon when I arrived at the next beach I wanted to check out so I told the person in charge of the little run down hotel where I had decided to sleep that I wanted to drive around.  She said “don’t go down that road”.  Well, that happened to be exactly the road I had planned to go down.  So I proceed carefully and it didn’t look that bad to me.

And not 30 seconds after I have that thought I’m stuck in mud up to the frame.  I walk back to hotel, find three young gringo surfer dudes and say “come on, the beers on me”.

This was when I really got the picture of just how far the dollar goes in Panama.  Between the four of us we had about three 6-packs of beer.  I figured that would eat up most of a twenty so I handed the waiter $20.  He gave me back $15 + change!  Damn I wish I had liked Panama as much as C.R. but… I didn’t.  So I looked at a few more beaches.  Actually all the way from Panama City to just below the Costa Rican border.  Didn’t do anything else stupid.  Went back to C.R. one day early.

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SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis plumitapacifica.com

28 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 4 continued

I arrive in Panama City. The airport is south of the city so I ask the friendly car rental person, who speaks pretty good English, to go over my map with me. Mainly just to navigate me through the city.  I knew that once I got through the city I’d be fine.

Well, it’s hard to describe how confusing, or many times non-existent, Central American road signs can be.

Signs sometimes even point the wrong direction because somebody hit the pole and no one ever bothered to set it straight.  Panama City is a big city with a beautiful modern skyline.  You really see the American influence there.  They even use the U.S. dollar as their currency and it stretches much further there than in C.R.   (But the beaches and the girls aren’t as pretty.)

Unlike C.R., the roads are great and well maintained.  I was beginning to like the place already.  I’m navigating my way through the city when I begin to realize I’m lost.  No problem, I can figure this out.  Uh oh, I’m more lost.  Now I’m confused and losing my sense of direction. Uh oh, now not only do I have no idea where I am or what direction I’m even going, I notice there are police armed with what looks like machine guns every couple blocks.  And I’m obviously in a neighborhood I don’t want to be in!  So the next cop I see I pull up to him and point at my map.  He starts rattling off in rapid fire “Spanish” god only knows what.  I put Spanish in quotation marks because in Panama they speak a slightly different form of Spanish.  It’s like the difference between Ca. English and a deep south accent.  In Panama they drop their D’s and S’s.  For example, the word for fish is “pescado”.  In Panama it’s “pecao”.  So I’m totally confused and the cop finally realizes this.  But then I figure out he is asking me if he can get in my car.  You bet!   Because the one thing I know is they are almost always proud to be of help.  So I indicate yes.  He waves to another cop across the street and they both climb in, machine guns and all, and literally, escort me to the highway.  Fantastic!   I’m saved.

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis plumitapacifica.com

27 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 4 continued

However I’m thankful I found and bought my lot when I did because two months after escrow closed someone sent me an email offering twice what I paid for it.  I got in just before the door closed that would have priced me out of the market.

But back to Panama.  Because I had encountered so much frustration trying to find exactly what I wanted in C.R. with zero favorable results I had decided that maybe I was just barking up the wrong tree.  Panama and Nicaragua were next on my list and since the U.S. had had such a strong presence in Panama I decided to start there. I must say, Panama still in many ways is more attractive than C.R.  If your budget is somewhat limited like mine was I would actually start looking there.  As far as investment goes, any of the three are fantastic. I don’t see prices really leveling off until we run out of baby boomers or there is a major down turn in the U.S. economy. (It was November 2008 when I wrote this and sure enough… the U.S economy crashed in 2010 and so did Costa Rica’s.)

Since writing that last line it still appears that Panama is a bargain compared to C.R.  As a matter of fact, Costa Ricans who can afford to travel sometimes go to Panama to shop.

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis plumitapacifica.com

26 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 4

LOST IN PANAMA

The trip I took in which I found the lot I ended up buying included a trip to Panama because I had become discouraged about ever finding what I wanted in C.R.

Trip after trip I was led on wild goose chases by realtors or the lot was out of my price range or had some other drawback.  And with each trip the prices were getting higher and I realized that very soon they would surpass what my budget would allow.  Prices have been escalating at the rate of about 20% or more per year for several years now.  (p.s. this story occurred in 2008…)  It seems that all of a sudden C.R. has been discovered by, my theory is, gringo baby boomers.

Since I began living here (three years after this episode) I’m on a plane once a month back to Ca. for business purposes and it seems that most of the people I talk to fit into that category.  And for good reason.  After all, most of us grew up spending every penny we made on our “keep up with the Jones’s” lifestyles and with retirement looming we look at our retirement account and realize that no way will it sustain a comfortable lifestyle in the U.S. after the “job” ends.  So where can we go where our dollar stretches further?

Well, C.R. has been a stable Democracy for 100 years, it’s emerging from the 3rd world (albeit with interesting growing pains), has a climate almost identical to Hawaii’s along the beaches and near perfect inland, is actually prettier than Hawaii, very American friendly people, with 25,000 + U.S. expats sprinkled throughout already so no matter where you go you can find someone to talk to and is affordable now.

Although you really need to know some basic Spanish.

 

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis plumitapacifica.com

23 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 3 continued

Me, a total stranger, and they trust me to do right… wow.  Yep, the kid said “a la derecha or a la isquierda” and in about five minutes I was at the guy’s house.  He has a little girl about the same age and they’re playmates.  The house is an architectural delight!  Had some coffee with the guy and his wife, ooood and awed about their house and followed the guy’s directions to get back to the main road.  If I had made a left instead of a right in the first place I probably wouldn’t have gotten lost, but then I wouldn’t have had that wonderful experience either.

And an interesting side note here.  The little boy, who of course spoke only Spanish, and the little girl, who of course spoke only English, jabbered away at each other and interacted as though they were speaking the same language.  It was incredible to watch!

Unfortunately I did not have my camera with me, but I would have loved to have a photo of the two kids together… if only I had known!

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis plumitapacifica.com

22 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 3

TRUST WITH A CHILD

I had met a gringo couple at a fiesta in Junquillal who had just completed a 4000 sq. ft. house about a ten minute drive from the beach.  From their description it sounded pretty spectacular (turns out… it is!).  So I decided to try to find it the next day.

The story starts here.  The house is located back in the jungle on top of a ridge with a 180% view of the ocean… wow!  But, as is typical in Costa Rica, there are little dirt roads everywhere and no signs.  So, I’m lost in the jungle but have a sense I might be close.  I pass a house that’s near what turns out to be a dead end so I turn around and see a young woman and a little boy (he was six) approaching me from the house.  Not wanting to scare anyone, because I know they don’t see many people driving around there, especially since I remembered I had passed a sign that said something about private property (not sure because my Spanish is still very limited), I stopped so I could explain myself.

I told the young lady that I was looking for the house of (what’s his name).  She has a phone in her hand and she’s talking to someone.  She hands the phone to me.  I say “hola”.  The guy on the other end says in broken English “who are you and what do you want?”   I tell him my name and that I’m looking for this guys house.  He says “oh, ok, give the phone back to the lady”.  So I do.  They have a very brief conversation, and she hangs up the phone.  The next thing I know, she opens my car door, puts the six year old in, and says something that indicates to me he’s going to direct me to this guy’s house!!

Would that ever happen in paranoid California!!!  I was so touched!  I thought “this is another reason I love this place and the people here”.

 

SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise by Gary Davis plumitapacifica.com

21 Aug

This is the continuation of a series of blogs to promote the e-book SO YOU WANT to LIVE in COSTA RICA – which is a guide to… the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise… This is a guide book that will give you the kind of insider’s knowledge that you might wish you had before you made your decision to move or not move to Costa Rica.

Every blog entry will start with the appendix because that way when you read whatever else I have posted it will 1. make sense (I hope) and 2. give you a point of reference in case you realize you need to read something that is “archived”.  Because if you read every blog I enter you will have eventually read the whole e-book and won’t need to order it for $2.99 from Amazon or B&N.  All you’ll be missing are the photos that show what you might expect if you choose to undertake the Adventures, Trials and Tribulations of Settling in Paradise.

As I said, I will start each blog with the appendix so that the reader can reference important elements of the book to archived blogs.  The page numbers shown are the actual page they appear on in the book. Here is the Appendix – and these are all the nuggets and their corresponding page numbers: Definition of “nugget” – 3, Doors & Windows – 7, Manufacturing – 11, Real Estate – 11, Shipping – 12,Maps, – 15, Corporations – 20, Traffic Cops – 23, Know basic Spanish – 30, Panama – 33, Roof Line – 42, Plumita Pacifica Web Address – 65, Getting the Best a Tico has to Offer – 84, Power Surges – 86, Liberia Airport – 88, Attitude – 104, Cellular Phones – 117, Newspapers – 18, Your Embassy – 137, Buying & Selling Cars – 154, Drive Slowly – 161, Arriving at the Airport – 168, Wages & Prices – 170, Undertows – 226, Life Ring – 230, Avoiding Customs Confiscations – 234, Driving Rules – 236, Walking in the City – 249, Purchasing Anything – 258, Buying Fresh Produce – 263, Bus Tickets – 272, to “Bribe” or not to “Bribe” – 313, Traffic ticket Prices – 315, Exiting the Country – 337

chapter 2 continued

So I tell them where I want to go.  I’ll be damned if one of them didn’t speak a little English!  What luck!  Because he was able to say “go to this (landmark) turn right, go to the next (landmark) turn left, and so forth.

Had he not known a little English I wouldn’t have had a clue because these landmarks were words in Spanish I didn’t know.

I take off, find the landmarks, make the turns and whoopee, I’m at the beach in another half hour.  There’s absolutely nothing there except a tico house with an extended covered patio that they sort of called a bar/restaurant.  And they had one customer, a cop.  In the boonies like that the cops ride dirt bikes (must be fun).  So once again I’m in luck because by now it’s getting late enough in the day that I’m a little uncomfortable thinking about trying to back track and since I know there’s got to be another way out, I show the cop my map.  Sure enough, not only does he know exactly how I should go but he also knows exactly where I shouldn’t go.  He knows where the road is washed out and impassable but how to get around it.

Even though you’ll read in the chapters on “traffic tickets” my general disdain for the circumstances involved in interactions with traffic cops you’ll find that for the most part they are friendly and, like most ticos, try to be helpful.

 

So I buy us a beer, he’s happy, I have a little lunch and just then these two young guys (gringo’s) in another 4×4 pull up.  They’re lost too.  So we go over my map.  Make sure we’ve got the cops directions down right.  Have a couple more beers and they’re ready to go.  I tell them not to take off until they see my car move and they say “oh, no, we need you to follow us anyway because our car totally craps out now and then”.  Is this the blind leading the blind?   My car starts, we’re off and I swear we’re back to where I started from in less than an hour using the cop’s directions.  But by this time it’s around 4pm, we’re almost at the end of Peninsula Nicoya, there’s a ferry that goes from the end across the gulf to the mainland town of Puntarenas, and we decide to take it.  We get to the ferry, stop our cars, buy our tickets, it’s time to get on the ferry, my car starts, theirs is dead.

11/5/12 ch 2 cont.

We push their car onto the ferry,  about an hour later we’re in Puntarenas, push it off on the other side with a little speed, it starts and then the search is on for a place to get it fixed.  That’s almost a whole other story in itself.  But I was headed to Jaco for the night, which is about an hour from Puntarenas and a whole lot more fun, so I offer them a ride.  Yes, they say, and they’ll hitch hike back for their car the next day.  I left them at the eye candy store (a bar with a multitude of pretty ticas) late that night after many more beers.  I guess they made it back to their car the next day.

But before I leave this adventure, let me tell you about the ferry ride.  This is an old ferry but it has both an enclosed deck and an open deck.  When there’s nice weather, which is about 95% of the time, people gather on the open deck.  There’s food, beer, a well stocked bar and it’s totally party time for the hour or so that it takes to get across the gulf.

I got the most beautiful shots of a sunset I’ve ever been able to get.